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Friday, November 4, 2011 - 14:12
  CORPORATE FUNDRAISING TRAINING CARA EFEKTIF PENGGALANGAN DANA SOSIAL PERUSAHAAN   Hotel Asida, Batu - Malang, 6-8 Desember2011   SUCCESSFUL CORPORATE FUNDRAISING   Corporate fundraising training adalah salah satu sarana bagi lembaga maupun organisasi sosial (LSM, NGO, LAZ, Ornop) untuk memanfaatkan potensi sumber dana dari perusahaan dengan mendalami seluk beluk CSR dan program-programnya serta cara-cara dan strategi untuk mengaksesnya. Training ini akan mengantarkan anda untuk memahami cara bekerja sama dengan perusahaan. Kami memberikan teori dan ruang praktek untuk mengimplementasikan strategi yang aplikatif dalam menjalin komunikasi dengan perusahaan. Kami membantu anda menjadi fundraiser yang handal untuk memikat hati perusahan. Dari mulai pengenalan konsep, penyusunan strategi, sampai membuat event yang inspiratif. Kami akan memberikan rahasia sederhana untuk menjadi istimewa yang dapat langsung anda praktekan. Kami juga akan mempertemukan...Read More
Friday, November 4, 2011 - 14:03
August 2011 | News Feature by Gordon Lubold When it comes to creating stability and solving the world’s security problems, it may be counterintuitive that a military man believes in the power of the economy – and not the military. But indeed he does. Col. Kevin McDonnell is retiring this month after 26 years in the Army’s Special Forces community. He has thought a lot about the conflict zones to which he’s deployed and how the next generation of soldiers can avoid them. After a decade of war, the U.S. military doesn’t want the job as world policeman, and seasoned officers like Kevin actively work to remain, essentially, unemployed. “On a macro level,” he says, “the greatest influence this country has is economic, not military,” McDonnell told USIP’s International Network for Economics and Conflict blog (INEC) recently. “But it’s the military tool that we’re quickest to swing because it generally...Read More
Friday, November 4, 2011 - 13:49
November 2010 | News Feature by Mimi Wiggins Perreault   Rhymes and rhythms can share ideas across cultures, and that is just what the Arab Hip Hop artists at the event, “Rhymes of Peace: Arab Hip Hop Artists on Youth and Media,” emphasized through their performances and discussions at the United States Institute of Peace. “Do I think that the Arab voice is loud enough in hip hop—I don’t think so, not yet,” said Arab hip hop artist the Narcicyst via video chat, at the October 27th, 2010 event. “I think the music, or the message is ahead of its time. I think it’s going to take a little bit of time, but somebody will break the barriers and eventually it will boost the voice.” The Narcicyst, along with hip hop artists Omar Offendum and Mana, participated in the forum. Theo Dolan, senior program officer at the Center of Innovation for Media, Conflict, and Peacebuilding, also contributed to the event by talking about...Read More
Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 12:37
October 2011 | On the Issues by Manal Omar October 24, 2011 Libyans have reacted overwhelmingly positively to the news of Muammar Qaddafi's death. USIP's Manal Omar discusses what impact his death will have on Libya's transition and future. What has been the reaction inside Libya to the announcement of Qaddafi’s death? Libyans have reacted overwhelmingly positively to the news and with a strong sense of celebration in the air. One of the primary complaints within Libya is that the country was eclipsed by the personality of Qaddafi. With him now out of the picture, the focus can return to the Libyan people. There has also been a strong call for the Transitional National Council (TNC) to demonstrate a new way of operating inside Libya by providing Qaddafi with a proper Muslim burial, and to be buried immediately in an unmarked grave. There has been strong condemnation on celebratory photos with the body, and emphasis that the new...Read More
Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 12:28
September 2011 | On the Issues by Mary Hope Schwoebel September 12, 2011 Somalia is currently experiencing the worst drought and famine in over half a century. Half of the population (close to four million people) is dependent on food aid, while tens of thousands are estimated to have died since the drought began this past summer.   In early September, the United Nations warned that as many as 750,000 people could die in the coming months if aid efforts are not ramped up. At least 150,000 have fled their homes seeking assistance in internally displaced persons (IDPs) camps located in Somalia’s capital, Mogadishu, and in refugee camps located in neighboring Kenya and Ethiopia.   Mary Hope Schwoebel, a senior program officer in USIP’s Academy for International Conflict Management and Peacebuilding, has extensive experience in Somalia. Here, she discusses the latest crisis in Somalia and how it impacts security in the...Read More
Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 12:24
July 2011 | Congressional Testimony by Mona Yacoubian July 12, 2011   USIP Middle East Senior Program Officer, Mona Yacoubian, testified before the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission at the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. The views expressed are those of the author and are not at the U.S. Institute of Peace, which does not take policy positions.   Good Morning, Mr. Chairman and distinguished Members of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. Thank you for inviting me to take part in this morning’s hearing. I want to commend the Human Rights Commission for holding this very important hearing on an issue of mounting concern—the human rights situation in Syria. I was asked to address the Syrian government’s response to ongoing protests and the resulting human rights challenges in Syria. I will keep my comments brief and ask that my prepared statement be made part of the record. Please note that...Read More
Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 12:20
October 2011 | News Feature by Steven Ruder October 28, 2011   Money spent on peace is an “investment” that will eventually “mature,” said Congressman John Garamendi (D-CA) at the U.S. Institute of Peace on Oct. 27, bringing both short- and long-term gains to the United States and countries around the world. Garamendi, who served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ethiopia from 1966 to 1968, offered his remarks at a USIP event marking the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps’ founding. Work that helps build stable, inclusive governments and developing communities’ capacity to be self-sustaining – the work done every day by USIP and the Peace Corps – is the kind of investment the U.S. should do more, Garamendi said. Congressman Sam Farr (D-CA), who served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia from 1964-1966, agreed. Peace Corps Director Aaron Williams called the two organizations “...Read More
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 11:39
Amir Telibečirović Lunjo Sarajevo - A connection between rock music and Islam might seem curious, but to a significant Muslim population in the city of Sarajevo this connection is neither new nor unusual. Locals have been experiencing it for decades. And a recent incarnation of this connection was demonstrated through the book The Taqwacores, which has since become the name of the musical punk movement that draws inspiration from Islam and Islamic culture. During the Communist era when Bosnia was a part of Yugoslavia, the city of Sarajevo was a significant centre for popular culture and various subcultures. From this era, beginning back in the early 1980s, a type of Taqwacore rock band emerged that was inspired by and focused on alternative rock and new wave music. The band’s name is Zabranjeno Pušenje, which in English means “no smoking”. Made up primarily of Christian, Catholic and Muslim musicians – though they insist they are all just “...Read More
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 11:36
Mike Prashker Ramla, Israel - My visit to the torched mosque in the Bedouin village of Tuba-Zangeriyah in Northern Israel is not something I will forget. I visited the fire-bombed mosque as part of a diverse delegation of Israeli non-governmental organisation (NGO) representatives, working together on “Kulanana”, an ambitious new initiative to shape a better shared future for all of Israel’s citizens. The mosque was torched in the early hours of 3 October by suspected Jewish fanatics, one more apparent outrage in a so-called “price tag” campaign of escalating terrorism, routinely directed at Palestinians in the West Bank, but now also towards Arab citizens of Israel. This attack represents another serious setback to relations between Israel’s 7.7 million citizens. Sixty-three years after Israel’s establishment, it is easy to feel demoralised by such events. Comprehensive research conducted for Kulanana shows that far too many of Israel’...Read More
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 11:34
Elektronita Duan Tobelo, Indonesia - From 1999 to 2002 the conflict between Christians and Muslims in the Indonesian islands of Maluku, including in my region – the island of Halmahera in North Maluku – resulted in the deaths of thousands of people and the displacement of thousands others. The conflict was eventually overcome, and solutions that were implemented at the time may offer insight into inter-religious violence could be contained and prevented from morphing into something larger and more critical. The factors that foster inter-religious conflict generally include economic hardship felt by a particular group or groups, deteriorating relationships between community members, an unstable or weak government and sectarian politics. In 1998 Indonesia’s economy was in dire straits. The East Asian economic crisis affected people in mid- to low-income brackets, and lasted long enough to create unrest among Indonesians. Seemingly minor events quickly escalated into...Read More
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 11:26
Manar Ammar Cairo - Images of Mohamed Tantawy, chief of the ruling military council in Egypt, meeting with Coptic Pope Shenouda III last week brought back memories of the old regime’s attempts to defuse sectarian tensions through staged meetings which often resulted in nothing. Yet, this most recent meeting comes at a very critical moment in Egypt’s modern history and could be a great step in the right direction. The Tantawy-Shenouda meeting was an attempt to contain the crisis following the violent confrontation between the armed forces and thousands of Coptic protesters who were marching for their rights in front of the state television building on 9 October. The clash left 27 protesters dead and hundreds more injured in the most violent attack on Copts in years. Tantawy and Shenouda’s meeting resulted in both parties agreeing to resolve key concerns of the Coptic community, primarily the right to build new churches and obtain licenses for those that currently...Read More
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 11:19
Aida Rehouma and Rabab Fayad Tunis/Geneva - On 23 October, the country that sparked the Arab Spring led the region from revolution to political self-determination. Over 90 per cent of eligible Tunisian voters went to the polls to cast their ballots for the new 217-seat Constituent Assembly, a body that is tasked with both writing a new constitution and forming the new interim government. While the voting process was praised by the international community, the election result – namely the fact that an Islamic political party won a plurality – has disquieted some Western observers. There is concern about the growing strength of Islamic political movements in Tunisia and their impact on domestic issues, such as human and women’s rights. However, the election results have painted a more complex picture and should be examined more closely to truly grasp the trajectory of the country. Al-Nahda, the long-forbidden, self-proclaimed moderate Islamic political party, was the...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 11:01
Rebecca M. Stone Charlottesville, Virginia - Darryl is a 12-year-old African American boy whose mother, Ariel, is a single parent. Ariel left high school after becoming pregnant with Darryl and has struggled to find anything but minimum wage jobs to support her family. One day when he was out with another friend, Darryl noticed his neighbour had accidentally left the front door ajar upon leaving. Without thinking through what they were doing, he and his friend snuck into the neighbour’s house and stole a video game that they hid in Darryl’s room. When the neighbours came home and realised someone had robbed their house, they called the police. Looking at Darryl’s story, one might conclude that the future does not bode well for him. In fact, we probably would not be surprised if we were to learn later on that he was in prison. However, there is much more to his story, and a great deal that we can learn from it. The police response ultimately resulted in a...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:55
Shazia Kamal Washington, DC - Mehrunisa Qayyum, in her blog PITAPOLICY, which covers politics and analyses development in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, assessed the most recent list of the top 100 Arab women by ArabianBusiness.com, noting the growing impact of “women who have transformed their business entrepreneurial skills into social entrepreneurship….” The power of activism lies in the ability to mobilise all segments of society to raise awareness of and propel action on a particular issue. In order to achieve these goals when it comes to women’s rights issues in the Middle East, activists are adopting the tools of successful female social entrepreneurs – community-based women's project opportunities, social media and global partnerships. A great example of community-based entrepreneurship is the Sakhra Women’s Cooperative. Founded by Zeinab Al-Momani in Lebanon, this organisation is the first women’s agricultural...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:53
Moha Ennaji Fez, Morocco - Influenced by the events in Egypt and Tunisia, Moroccans have been demanding political and constitutional rights that would give citizens greater influence in government affairs. But unlike their neighbours, Moroccans have not made large-scale calls for regime change. This difference should not be seen as complacence. Instead, it stems from a desire to hold on to the monarchy while simultaneously applying pressure for democratic reform. The monarchy is deeply rooted in Moroccan culture and enjoys a great deal of legitimacy. In fact, since taking power in 1999, King Mohammed VI has effectively implemented several reforms, most notably guaranteeing women greater rights and equality with men, and establishing the Equity and Reconciliation Council in 2004 to document cases of forced disappearances and arbitrary detention during the former king’s brutal reign. In a speech earlier this year, King Mohammed VI responded to the demands of protesters by...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:53
Moha Ennaji Fez, Morocco - Influenced by the events in Egypt and Tunisia, Moroccans have been demanding political and constitutional rights that would give citizens greater influence in government affairs. But unlike their neighbours, Moroccans have not made large-scale calls for regime change. This difference should not be seen as complacence. Instead, it stems from a desire to hold on to the monarchy while simultaneously applying pressure for democratic reform. The monarchy is deeply rooted in Moroccan culture and enjoys a great deal of legitimacy. In fact, since taking power in 1999, King Mohammed VI has effectively implemented several reforms, most notably guaranteeing women greater rights and equality with men, and establishing the Equity and Reconciliation Council in 2004 to document cases of forced disappearances and arbitrary detention during the former king’s brutal reign. In a speech earlier this year, King Mohammed VI responded to the demands of protesters by...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:32
Natana J. Delong-Bas Boston, Massachusetts - The capture and killing of Libya’s Muammar Qaddafi, on-going demonstrations for an end to the oppressive reigns of Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh and Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, and new elections in Tunisia show that one thing has not changed in the Arab Spring – change itself. Even in Saudi Arabia, where requests for reform have not called for regime change, change is proving inevitable with the death of Crown Prince Sultan and questions about what direction the soon-to-be-named new crown prince may take the country. Much of the world’s attention has focused not only on political changes in these countries – but also what these changes mean for the region’s women. My friend and colleague, Egyptian cultural anthropologist Yasmin Moll, and I were recently talking about our frustration with this method of framing the issues as it seems to suggest that the meaning of these changes for women is somehow...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:32
Natana J. Delong-Bas Boston, Massachusetts - The capture and killing of Libya’s Muammar Qaddafi, on-going demonstrations for an end to the oppressive reigns of Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh and Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, and new elections in Tunisia show that one thing has not changed in the Arab Spring – change itself. Even in Saudi Arabia, where requests for reform have not called for regime change, change is proving inevitable with the death of Crown Prince Sultan and questions about what direction the soon-to-be-named new crown prince may take the country. Much of the world’s attention has focused not only on political changes in these countries – but also what these changes mean for the region’s women. My friend and colleague, Egyptian cultural anthropologist Yasmin Moll, and I were recently talking about our frustration with this method of framing the issues as it seems to suggest that the meaning of these changes for women is somehow...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:30
Safia Aoude Alexandria, Egypt - "We can write anything now!" said an editor of the Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram to some visiting Danish participants in Cairo as a part of a recent Alexandria-based conference called “Media´s Role for Changing Society and Democracy”. The Egyptian revolution has certainly become a catalyst for free speech and for more political debate in Egyptian media. Yet, the chaotic climate of the revolution has also suffered some backlash. Another editor at Al-Ahram warned that the media in Egypt is now in a political limbo, and can sometimes even motivate the Egyptian public towards sectarian violence and false information. The conference and the changing media landscape made it clear to all participants that both mass media communication, as well as Muslim-Christian dialogue, were of immense importance during this time of transition in Egypt. And participants did note that the media has the potential to promote positive dialogue. New...Read More
Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - 10:29
Safia Aoude Alexandria, Egypt - "We can write anything now!" said an editor of the Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram to some visiting Danish participants in Cairo as a part of a recent Alexandria-based conference called “Media´s Role for Changing Society and Democracy”. The Egyptian revolution has certainly become a catalyst for free speech and for more political debate in Egyptian media. Yet, the chaotic climate of the revolution has also suffered some backlash. Another editor at Al-Ahram warned that the media in Egypt is now in a political limbo, and can sometimes even motivate the Egyptian public towards sectarian violence and false information. The conference and the changing media landscape made it clear to all participants that both mass media communication, as well as Muslim-Christian dialogue, were of immense importance during this time of transition in Egypt. And participants did note that the media has the potential to promote positive dialogue. New...Read More

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